Effect of early formative shaping on newly planted broadleaves - Part 2: Height and diameter growth.

  • M. Bulfin Teagasc, Kinsealy Research Centre, Malahide Road, Dublin 17.
  • T. Radford Teagasc, Kinsealy Research Centre, Malahide Road, Dublin 17.
Keywords: Broadleaves, leading shoot quality, formative shaping, quality measurement, apical training, early management.

Abstract

Formative shaping for quality was applied to 1,380 trees, commencing during the second growing season after planting. A similar number was kept as a control. The purpose of this trial was to assess the effect, if any, of formative shaping on early stem quality. Over a 4-year period, height and diameter growth were also monitored, to assess the effect, if any, of formative shaping on these parameters. This paper (Part 2) describes the effect of formative shaping on the height and diameter growth of eight species included in the trial: common ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.); common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.); cherry (Prunus avium L.) ; pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.); sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.); sessile oak (Q. petraea (Mattuschka) Lieb1ein); sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.); and common walnut (iuglans regia L.). Formative shaping had a significant positive effect on the height growth of ash, sweet chestnut and sycamore, and a significant negative effect on the diameter growth of ash, cherry, sweet chestnut, sycamore and walnut. The negative effect on diameter is regarded from a silvicultural perspective as being of negligible importance. Formative shaping should commence as early as possible in the rotation, ideally when trees are 1.0- 1.6 m in height .
Published
1998-11-01
How to Cite
Bulfin, M., & Radford, T. (1998). Effect of early formative shaping on newly planted broadleaves - Part 2: Height and diameter growth. Irish Forestry. Retrieved from https://journal.societyofirishforesters.ie/index.php/forestry/article/view/9856
Section
Articles