A review of historical literature on the pruning (formative shaping) of broadleaved trees from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century.

  • Michael Bulfin Teagasc, Kinsealy Research Centre, Malahide Road, Dublin 17.
  • Toddy Radford Teagasc, Kinsealy Research Centre, Malahide Road, Dublin 17.
Keywords: Broadleaves, historical review, formative shaping, pruning, time of pruning, leader training, stumping-back.

Abstract

This paper is a review of selected historical British literature on tree pruning from 1595 to about 1840. The authors strongly promoted the use of early pruning (formative shaping) to improve stem quality in broadleaved trees, especially in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and oak (Quercus spp.). They indicated that pruning was needed despite the high planting density used at that time. Most authors advocated pruning in the first year. All authors indicated that pruning should be a continuous process over a number of years. Those who examined the correct season for pruning advocated summer pruning. Some authors advised against the use of 'flush' pruning or leaving 'snags'.
Published
2001-11-01
How to Cite
Bulfin, M., & Radford, T. (2001). A review of historical literature on the pruning (formative shaping) of broadleaved trees from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. Irish Forestry. Retrieved from https://journal.societyofirishforesters.ie/index.php/forestry/article/view/9911
Section
Articles